Blog Archives

Mob Programming for Large Group Writing

It is always a daunting task to bring several (10+) innovative, energetic, and experienced individuals together for not only visioning, but also articulating that vision in a way that speaks to a wide variety of professional paths within an industry. All of us had one thing in common; we believed in the power of the agile mindset in education. Excellent steps were taken to ensure maximum effectiveness in our collaboration … Before we met, we took an assessment that identified … [Read More]


Inspect and Adapt: A Learning Coach Practice

There are two major practice levels that an academic coach needs in order to focus on being a learning coach for adult students need in order for them successful in a fast-paced learning environment. The first level is what I would call “big picture” approach of coaching, regardless of the gaps and goals, there is a mindset towards inspecting and adapting. The second practice level, which I will address in future posts, focus on specific target areas and strategies for addressing … [Read More]


Facilitating Collaboration

Whether we are facilitating a small brainstorming group, training a large class, or teaching an academic course, we fall susceptible to the “it’s really important to collaborate” practice. What in the world does that mean? Just chat about it? If you are shuddering at the thought of “discussion items” on a meeting agenda as much as I am, we both know it’s not about dropping a topic bomb on the table and seeing where it goes.


Representing Affective Learning in the Materials

We crave expression of feeling, as proven by our incessant need to construct emotional representation in our typing. Remember <3 ? Then it got exciting when we got the red heart. Now we have broken hearts, beating hearts, and rainbowed hearts, but you see my point. Words are never enough. So, my dear instructional designers, trainers, and facilitators out there, why do we settle for cognitive learning instead of blending it with affect?


Facilitating Beyond the Topic

It easy for me to discuss how fast a facilitator can go tunnel vision with their learners because I’ve fallen into the trap so many times. Even with a good start for a course, the best of intentions can quickly disintegrate into assessment/interaction and appropriately timed updates. Mechanical being the optimal word here. I was snapped out of my reverie when a student left me the painful feedback that “it felt like she just had a process and there wasn’t any … [Read More]


Leading Learning Workshops

Today was a fantastic day leading a collaboration and learning workshop in Ohio for humanities and social science adjunct faculty, blending methods from Open Space and Lean Coffee to facilitate the workshop. Not having a strong sense of the faculty needs initially, I hosted several Lean Coffees across different cities in Ohio where this institution maintained sites this past February and March, as well as an online Lean Coffee, which was quite interesting, and successful, I must say. This drove … [Read More]


Taxonomies of Learning

Bloom’s (1956) cognitive taxonomy are widely accepted and used in both academics and T&D areas of corporate learning. In the spike of learning responsibility across the globe, though, that is a limited number of people with knowledge of its value. Even then, there are few within those groups that apply the affective taxonomy developed twenty years later by Bloom, Krathwohl, and Masia (1973). Despite the challenge, the combined application of these taxonomies is worth the effort to provide a holistic … [Read More]


Creating Holistic Learning Experiences

Facilitating a course or workshop that engages the participant and is easy for you to create is the ultimate achievement. However, to do that, there is a need to instill responsibility and motivation within your participants, which requires some knowledge of adult learning theory and whole person learning approaches.


Acton University Reflections

It always surprises me that, after a week of incredible sharing, thinking, and reflecting, I’m exhausted. That week was also a changing point in my doctorate from despair to inspiration. The week ended with my learning how to use all four positions on the cello and watching an enlightening talk about embracing uncertainty by Dan North. Topping that week’s experience is going to be difficult, but frankly, I’m not sure my brain is up to it anyway at the moment! … [Read More]


Intentional Silo-busting

It’s always a joy to get insights into another industry that has an effect of silo-busting. Any time we experience interdisciplinary research or practice, that is also a great silo-busting experience. A big scale example is how neuroscience has been positively impacted by several disciplines for ground breaking discovery of how our brain develops. A more immediate example for me is how agile methodology and lean systems for software is the inspiration for  the curriculum design model I developed. However, … [Read More]


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About Marian

My passion is centered around ensuring effective learning experiences that improve people's lives. Developing a learning mindset is my ultimate goal whether working with academic programs or corporate training; formal or informal learning practices. It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning.

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